Lettuce Challenge | Story of your plants | 2.25.2015

Here they are.  Last days in the greenhouse before being delivered to the classroom.  Here’s a photo summary of their story so far.  We’re wishing them luck and can’t wait to hear the rest of their story from you.

20150225-144914.jpg
Ready for delivery on Thursday and Friday. Here’s the story of your lettuce plants
each little cell received ~ four little seeds.  We use the high-tech technique of hand-sprinkling.
Remember we started with seeds in January, planted by pollinators and green schools volunteers in our GEC Family Workshop.  When some seeds didn’t germinate, we planted some more a week later.
P1040107
They were placed in a special “transplanting” soil mix. (should read 1/2 part sand)
GEC Volunteers cared for each tray of seedlings, giving them water from below, and 12 hours of lights, using indoor lighting on timers for dark winter days
GEC Volunteers cared for each tray of seedlings, giving them water from below, and 12 hours of lights, using indoor lighting on timers for dark winter days.  Feb 12
lettuce challenge seedlings in the greenhouse
When the lettuce has grown a second pair of leaves it is ready to be transplanted.  We separate each plant out to its own peat pot.
Lisa Beebe demonstrates how to delicately transplant a seedling into a peat pot.  Recognize her special tool?  A chopstick!
Lisa Beebe demonstrates how to delicately separate and transplant a seedling into a peat pot. Recognize her special tool? A chopstick!  Feb 12
Each little seedling is planted up to the leaves, covering the soft white "neck"
Each little seedling is planted up to the leaves, covering the soft white “neck” with a premium organic soil.  Feb 12
20150225-144951.jpg
GEC Volunteers transplanting lettuce plants in the workshop. Volunteers worked over three days on hundreds of plants, 521 total!  How could we do this without them?  Feb 25
20150225-145030.jpg
Here they are the day before delivery. We took these covers off because they seemed a little warm. Remember, lettuce likes it cool.  Feb 25
20150225-145019.jpg
Plants were hand packed and separated today by green schools volunteers, with one plant for each student registered, 521 plants total.
20150225-144935.jpg
Your classroom kit will contain Popsicle sticks to label each plant. Peat pots need to be watered from below. One of our green schools volunteers has offered to provide each class with a cooking tray for ease of travel.
20150225-145008.jpg
but don’t forget you can get creative with your lettuce plant tray. Somebody out there has a green thumb from this one, in a plastic cup, decorated at our third Sunday family workshop!

Questions to ask about your plants that help tell their story.  Reread “tips from how to care for your plants” for ideas on how to light, water, and amendments affect growth.  If you are conducting a scientific experiment, you want to make sure you are starting with two plants that are approximately the same size.  However, if you’re telling interesting stories about plants, and looking really closely, you’ll notice that not all plants are exactly the same.

Invite the GEC to your school for a presentation and we’ll set up stations to help you describe your plants in comparison to others, the color, size, and shapes, to figure out and tell the story of your plant.  It’s a fun challenge, finding clues.

Are some bigger, younger, or older than others?  Why?  Why might that be beneficial for a garden?

Do some pots have more than one plant?  How will this affect growth?

Are any of the plants growing differently?   (There might be a few buttercrunch “speckles” out there, see if you can spot them!)

OTHER TRAY IDEAS from our family workshop.  What story did these trays have before we reused them under our plants?

P1040317
the bottom half of a mini plastic water bottle Feb 15
These live very nicely in mini dream gardens, created at Family Nature Play.
These trays help plants to live very nicely in mini dream gardens, created at Family Nature Play.  We can share this diorama file of cutouts if you are interested.  Looks like an interesting story happening here.
Any innovative ideas?  we saw cut milk cartons, plastic bags, and egg cartons, and look at that fancy watering can.
Any innovative ideas for trays?  We saw cut milk cartons, plastic bags, and egg cartons, and look at that fancy “watering can.”  See how you can read whether the plant is dry by the peat pot?
Next time you are in the greenhouse see if you can spot that seal that we used to do a crayon rubbing of.  This is a special 3D GEC garden.
Next time you are in the greenhouse see if you can spot that seal that we used to do a crayon rubbing of. This is a special 3D GEC garden, for the GEC volunteers.
but any tray will do!  Thanks for sharing your creative ideas.
Nothing fancy needed, any tray will do! Thanks for sharing your creative ideas.
Advertisements

One thought on “Lettuce Challenge | Story of your plants | 2.25.2015

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s